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If you happen to be in Vienna, one of our wonderful Artful artists - Nica Junker - will be holding a workshop at the LIK Photo Academy tonight.
Click here to see more of Nina’s stunning work on the Artful Project website:

https://www.theartfulproject.com/our-artists/new-node

If you happen to be in Vienna, one of our wonderful Artful artists - Nica Junker - will be holding a workshop at the LIK Photo Academy tonight.

Click here to see more of Nina’s stunning work on the Artful Project website:

https://www.theartfulproject.com/our-artists/new-node

The last days of Kodak Town are captured by Magnum photographers: http://ow.ly/yzghm

The last days of Kodak Town are captured by Magnum photographers: http://ow.ly/yzghm

We had a chance to whizz round the Free Range graduate shows at The Old Truman Brewery. Lots of exciting work… But prepare yourself - there’s a lot to take in.

Graduate shows are good for experimentation and self expression and Free Range was no exception. But there was also high quality execution too which reflects how graduate shows are really smartening up their act. 
As a public service for those too busy / too elsewhere to make it, we hope the following guided tour gives a tasty flavour of the event.
If you’re in the neighbourhood though, have a look see.

As Diane Arbus once said, “I really believe that there are things that people won’t see unless I photograph them”

http://dnjgallery.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/now-you-see-it-photography-exhibition.html?m=1

As Diane Arbus once said, “I really believe that there are things that people won’t see unless I photograph them”

http://dnjgallery.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/now-you-see-it-photography-exhibition.html?m=1

Thanks to Caroline Banks for featuring the Artful Project on the one-minute blog:

http://www.carolinebanks.co.uk/?p=4936

Thanks to Caroline Banks for featuring the Artful Project on the one-minute blog:

http://www.carolinebanks.co.uk/?p=4936

A subject close to our heart: what’s next for art in the digital age

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorikozlowski/2014/06/18/whats-next-for-art-in-the-digital-age-a-conversation-to-be-continued/
Is photography an object or an image, or is it a way of seeing?

http://www.museum-folkwang.de/en/exhibitions/current-exhibtions/misunderstanding-photography.html
*Artful musings on Amazon Art*


There’s been a lot of coverage of Amazon Art since it was launched last year and it’s certainly an enterprise we’ve been watching with great interest.

Here at Artful we’ve been trying to work out whether Amazon Art is a ‘good thing’, ‘bad thing’ or just an ‘interesting thing’. After all, when a
behemoth like Amazon sets its sights on a new market, things are rarely the same again.

The first reaction to Amazon Art was certainly skeptical. Books, cameras
and clothing are one thing, but art? Like Amazon Funerals or Amazon
Psychotherapy – some things you just don’t want to buy through an online megastore. Where’s the personal touch? Where’s the curation? Where’s the love?

But even if the idea sounds counterintuitive, it’s such an intriguing, surprising and provocative notion that it’s hard to dismiss. Indeed, we’re tempted to become an Amazon registered gallery ourselves. After all, our
‘art for everyone’ philosophy would be quite at home with a business of
Amazon’s scale and reach.

The question of whether it’ll work or not is, in a sense, irrelevant. Perhaps it will, perhaps it won’t. More important, and most exciting to us, is the potential it has to shake things up. Conventional art galleries
could do with a healthy dose of disruption and Amazon Art, by its very nature, is a fox in the art establishment hen house. Above all, and here we certainly find cause for optimism, it’s a sign of the vitality and growth of online art sales.

Gandhi famously said, “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” One year since the launch of Amazon Art, the laughing has definitely gone quiet…

*Artful musings on Amazon Art*


There’s been a lot of coverage of Amazon Art since it was launched last year and it’s certainly an enterprise we’ve been watching with great interest.

Here at Artful we’ve been trying to work out whether Amazon Art is a ‘good thing’, ‘bad thing’ or just an ‘interesting thing’. After all, when a
behemoth like Amazon sets its sights on a new market, things are rarely the same again.

The first reaction to Amazon Art was certainly skeptical. Books, cameras
and clothing are one thing, but art? Like Amazon Funerals or Amazon
Psychotherapy – some things you just don’t want to buy through an online megastore. Where’s the personal touch? Where’s the curation? Where’s the love?

But even if the idea sounds counterintuitive, it’s such an intriguing, surprising and provocative notion that it’s hard to dismiss. Indeed, we’re tempted to become an Amazon registered gallery ourselves. After all, our
‘art for everyone’ philosophy would be quite at home with a business of
Amazon’s scale and reach.

The question of whether it’ll work or not is, in a sense, irrelevant. Perhaps it will, perhaps it won’t. More important, and most exciting to us, is the potential it has to shake things up. Conventional art galleries
could do with a healthy dose of disruption and Amazon Art, by its very nature, is a fox in the art establishment hen house. Above all, and here we certainly find cause for optimism, it’s a sign of the vitality and growth of online art sales.

Gandhi famously said, “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” One year since the launch of Amazon Art, the laughing has definitely gone quiet…

*Artful musings on Amazon Art*


There’s been a lot of coverage of Amazon Art since it was launched last year and it’s certainly an enterprise we’ve been watching with great interest.

Here at Artful we’ve been trying to work out whether Amazon Art is a ‘good thing’, ‘bad thing’ or just an ‘interesting thing’. After all, when a
behemoth like Amazon sets its sights on a new market, things are rarely the same again.

The first reaction to Amazon Art was certainly skeptical. Books, cameras
and clothing are one thing, but art? Like Amazon Funerals or Amazon
Psychotherapy – some things you just don’t want to buy through an online megastore. Where’s the personal touch? Where’s the curation? Where’s the love?

But even if the idea sounds counterintuitive, it’s such an intriguing, surprising and provocative notion that it’s hard to dismiss. Indeed, we’re tempted to become an Amazon registered gallery ourselves. After all, our
‘art for everyone’ philosophy would be quite at home with a business of
Amazon’s scale and reach.

The question of whether it’ll work or not is, in a sense, irrelevant. Perhaps it will, perhaps it won’t. More important, and most exciting to us, is the potential it has to shake things up. Conventional art galleries
could do with a healthy dose of disruption and Amazon Art, by its very nature, is a fox in the art establishment hen house. Above all, and here we certainly find cause for optimism, it’s a sign of the vitality and growth of online art sales.

Gandhi famously said, “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” One year since the launch of Amazon Art, the laughing has definitely gone quiet…

*Artful musings on Amazon Art*


There’s been a lot of coverage of Amazon Art since it was launched last year and it’s certainly an enterprise we’ve been watching with great interest.

Here at Artful we’ve been trying to work out whether Amazon Art is a ‘good thing’, ‘bad thing’ or just an ‘interesting thing’. After all, when a
behemoth like Amazon sets its sights on a new market, things are rarely the same again.

The first reaction to Amazon Art was certainly skeptical. Books, cameras
and clothing are one thing, but art? Like Amazon Funerals or Amazon
Psychotherapy – some things you just don’t want to buy through an online megastore. Where’s the personal touch? Where’s the curation? Where’s the love?

But even if the idea sounds counterintuitive, it’s such an intriguing, surprising and provocative notion that it’s hard to dismiss. Indeed, we’re tempted to become an Amazon registered gallery ourselves. After all, our
‘art for everyone’ philosophy would be quite at home with a business of
Amazon’s scale and reach.

The question of whether it’ll work or not is, in a sense, irrelevant. Perhaps it will, perhaps it won’t. More important, and most exciting to us, is the potential it has to shake things up. Conventional art galleries
could do with a healthy dose of disruption and Amazon Art, by its very nature, is a fox in the art establishment hen house. Above all, and here we certainly find cause for optimism, it’s a sign of the vitality and growth of online art sales.

Gandhi famously said, “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” One year since the launch of Amazon Art, the laughing has definitely gone quiet…

New folk art exhibition at Tate Britain. Who remembers the Jimmy Savile scarecrow at the Jeremy Deller folk exhibition back in 2000?

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/british-folk-art

New folk art exhibition at Tate Britain. Who remembers the Jimmy Savile scarecrow at the Jeremy Deller folk exhibition back in 2000?

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/british-folk-art